Goodbye, Tree

 

As many of you already know, I’m not exactly Nature Girl. I have an extremely limited vocabulary to describe the natural world, mostly due to  . . . let’s face it, not really caring. I divide the green stuff I see around me into the loose genres (is that the right word?) of “grassy”, “bushy”, “flowery”, “treelike”, and “snack”. Within these groups I can identify a handful of individual specimens. For instance, I know a rose when I see one. Also a dandelion.  I can correctly name a weeping willow, a maple tree (thanks to the Canadian flag) and staghorn sumac (gardenworld’s “Walking Dead”). In the “Snack” genre, I can recognize a cornstalk and several types of berries (assuming they are ripe and ready to pick). But that’s about it.

So I am at a loss to identify the tree in our garden that was destroyed in last week’s wildly raging storm. It was our biggest tree and a rare type – or so I was told by a visiting botanist about 15 years ago. I immediately forgot what he said the tree was and have been meaning to find out. It was very shapely and tall. It was very good at providing shade and privacy to my favorite spot on the screen porch. But half of its huge branches (– tree-sized themselves) were lying on the ground after the storm and the remaining half of the tree threatened to fall on our neighbor’s roof. It had to go.

Before After the Storm:                      After the Chainsaw:

               

I spent a good ten minutes today on the internet trying to identify the tree based on its leaf. The closest matches were “Norway Maple” and “Canadian Hawthorn” – both of which can’t be right. The tree has no flowers or nuts or four-inch, fatal-looking thorns. I was sort of hoping one of my many greenthumbed blog people could identify it. Thanks in advance! And while you are at your research, I will be out on the porch with my Kindle and glass of Coke, feeling ever-so-slightly more exposed.

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5 thoughts on “Goodbye, Tree

  1. Can you give some more information about the tree characteristics? Bark color and formation. Are the leaves compound? Here is a pretty good website for identification purposes. http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?guide=Trees&cl=US/VT
    And here are some possibilities:
    Wild Service Tree: http://www-saps.plantsci.cam.ac.uk/trees/service.htm
    Grey Poplar: https://www.keele.ac.uk/arboretum/trees/species/greypoplar/
    Good luck! And I hope this helps!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow, 227, somebody was BUSY with that chainsaw! Too bad about the loss of tree and shade. The leaf looks like a maple to me, but more full-figured than what grows here. I’ll call it a “Pudgy Maple.” 🙂

    Like

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